School District of Philadelphia

WELLNESS POLICY IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

September 2006 to September 2009


The School Reform Commission in conjunction with the Central Level School Health Council will begin to implement a federally mandated, United States Department of Agriculture, district-wide Wellness Policy that will support student and staff population to become “fit, healthy and ready to learn”. Through implementation of this Wellness Policy plan, students, staff, families and communities will become more knowledgeable and skilled in making behavior choices that support optimum health no later than the first day of the school year beginning after June 30, 2009.

The School District of Philadelphia Wellness Policy will establish the following:

1. SCHOOL HEALTH COUNCILS

Develop a Coordinated, School Health Council at each school by encouraging the use of the CDC Coordinated School Health Model as a template for health council development.

2. NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR ALL FOODS AVAILABLE ON SCHOOL CAMPUS DURING THE SCHOOL DAY

a. School Meal Guidelines

· Share information about the nutritional content of meals with parents and students
· Engage students and parents in focus groups using taste-tests of new entrees and surveys, to identify new, healthful, and appealing food choices
· Arrange bus schedules and utilize methods to serve school breakfasts that encourage participation, including serving breakfast in the classroom, "grab-and-go" breakfast, or scheduled breakfast
· Notify parents and students of the availability of the school meals program and with the possibilities of providing free or reduced-priced meals
· Encourage parents to provide a healthy breakfast for their children through newsletter articles, take-home materials, or other means
· Discourage students from sharing their foods or beverages with one another during meals or snack times, given concerns about allergies and other restrictions on some children's diets
· State that school celebrations that involve food during the school day will occur no more than one time per class per month. Each celebration should include food or beverage that meets nutrition standards

· Encourage that foods and beverages offered or sold at school-sponsored events outside the school day will meet the nutrition standards for foods and beverages
· State that schools will not use foods or beverages that do not meet the district’s nutrition standards or Beverage Policy compliance as rewards for academic performance or good behavior. Schools will not withhold food or beverages (including food served through school meals) as a punishment
· Meals served through the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, After School Program, Twilight Program and Summer Program, if applicable, will be:
o Appealing and attractive to children
o Served in clean and pleasant settings
o In compliance with, at a minimum, nutrition requirements established by local, state, and federal statutes and regulations
o Ensure that half of the offered grains are whole grain
o Offer additional servings of a variety of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains
o Decrease the salt and sugar in reimbursable meals, limit total fat to 30% of calories and saturated fat to 10% of calories in reimbursable meal weekly average
o In accordance with the current School District of Philadelphia Beverage Policy

b. Meal Times and Scheduling

· Make sure that schools are open in time for student meal times
· Provide students with at least 10 minutes to eat after sitting down for breakfast and 20 minutes after sitting down for lunch
· Schedule meal periods at appropriate times, e.g., lunch should be scheduled between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
· Work to not schedule tutoring, club, or organizational meetings or activities during mealtimes, unless students may eat during such activities
· Schedule lunch periods to follow lunch time recess periods (in elementary schools)
· Provide student’s access to hand washing or hand sanitizing before they eat meals or snacks
· Accommodate the tooth-brushing regimens of students with special oral health needs (e.g., orthodontia or high tooth decay risk)

c. Snacks
The Division of Food Services, the Schools, the School Stores, or any other school sponsored event will not purchase for sale to students any of the beverage products that do not comply with stated regulations:
· Total fat content must be less than or equal to 7 grams per serving
· Saturated fat content must be less than or equal to 2 grams per serving
· Sodium content must be less than or equal to 360 milligrams per serving
· Sugar content must be less than or equal to 15 grams per serving
· Candy will not be sold or served during the school day
· Snacks served during the school day, in after-school care, in enrichment programs, i.e. foods sold outside of reimbursable school meals, such as through vending machines, cafeteria a la carte [snack] lines, fundraisers, school stores, etc., or fundraising activities will meet USDA guidelines and School District of Philadelphia Snack Guidelines and Beverage Policy.

3. NUTRITION EDUCATION

Nutrition Education is part of the district Comprehensive Health Education standards-based program, and:
· Teaches, encourages and supports healthy eating by students
· Is taught across the curriculum
· Includes enjoyable, developmentally appropriate, culturally relevant, participatory activities, such as contests, promotions, taste testing, farm visits and school gardens
· Promotes fruit, vegetables, whole grain products, low-fat and fat-free dairy products, healthy food preparation methods, and health-enhancing nutrition practices
· Emphasizes caloric balance between food intake and energy expenditure
· Provides links with school meal programs, other school foods, nutrition-related community services and Home & School Councils
· Teaches media literacy with an emphasis on food marketing
· Teachers and nutrition professionals will receive professional development to enhance their skills in nutritional education training

4. PHYSICAL EDUCATION

All students enrolled, K-12, will have access to a sequential, comprehensive, standards-based Physical Education program taught by a certified Health and Physical Education teacher. The Physical Education program will:
· Not be listed and referred to as a prep
· Be recognized as an integral part of the core curriculum
· Be consistent and aligned with local, state and federal standards and guidelines
· Ensure that every effort is made to optimize Physical Education time in shared spaces (cafeterias, auditoriums, etc.)
· Include a physical fitness assessment for each student, using the Fitnessgram assessment tool.
· Devote at least 50 percent of class time to moderate to vigorous physical activity
· Be designed to meet the needs of all children (athletic and non-athletic), feature cooperative as well as competitive activities, and focus on understanding and ownership of personal fitness and wellness for life
· Include self-management, movement, cooperation, fair play and social skills
· Take into account gender and cultural differences in students’ interests
· Encourage classroom teachers to integrate concepts of movement and wellness across the curriculum
· Be an enjoyable experience
· Provide quality Professional Development to all PE teachers to stay current with research and current programs
· Encourage and actively engage families and community members to become advocates for quality physical education
· Not support or include “contract” or “waiver” opportunities for students K-12
· Not support physical activity being used as a punishment or consequence

5. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

· Students will be physically educated and acquire the knowledge and skills to understand the benefits of being physically active.
· Time will be devoted in the elementary schedule for supervised, safe recess
· Elementary students will be given “movement breaks” every 2 hours of seat time
· Opportunities will be provided for before and after-school physical activities, including clubs, intramurals and interscholastic athletics
· Opportunities for the staff to be physically active will be encouraged
· The Local School Health Council will apprise students, staff and families of programs that support physical activity and wellness in the community

6. OTHER SCHOOL-BASED ACTIVITIES

Non-stigmatizing atmosphere for students
Staff wellness collaboration with union and insurance providers
• Screenings for students for optimum health
• Care for chronic conditions
• Safe, clean and hygienic environment in all schools

Justification

Congress recognizes that schools play a critical role in promoting student health, preventing childhood obesity, and combating problems associated with poor nutrition and physical inactivity. To formalize and encourage this role, Congress passed a law (P.L. 108 - 265) in which each local educational agency participating in a program authorized by the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq) or the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 1771 et seq) shall establish a local school Wellness Policy by School Year 2006.

This legislation supports President George W. Bush's HealthierUS initiative. This Initiative helps Americans take steps to improve personal health and fitness and encourages all Americans, including children, to be physically active every day; eat a nutritious diet; get preventive screening; and make healthy choices.

The legislation also places the responsibility of developing a Wellness Policy at the local level, so that the individual needs of each district can be addressed. According to the requirements for the local Wellness Policy, school districts must set goals for nutrition education, physical education, physical activity, campus food provision, and other school-based activities designed to promote student wellness. Additionally, districts are required to involve a broad group of individuals in policy review Implementation. The nationwide trend of childhood obesity is also being addressed at the district level as all schools are mandated to measure student body mass index (BMI) and report the data home with the student. Schools will be asked to suggest ways for students to maintain healthy weight and/or reduce overweight/obesity. The Wellness Policy provides methods for schools to address this request and reverse the nationwide trend of overweight increased from 11 to 19% among 6-11 year olds between 1988-94 and 2003-2004. Among adolescents aged 12-19, overweight increased from 11 to 17% during the same period.

Evaluation Method

The Superintendent/Chief Executive Officer shall oversee the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the Wellness Policies. The Superintendent/Chief Executive Officer will provide evaluation results to the SRC. Implementation, evaluation and monitoring of the Wellness Policy are subject to review and approval by the Superintendent/Chief Executive Officer.

The Office of Health, Safety, Physical Education & Sports Administration (HSPESA) will oversee technical assistance and coordination of the initiative. The Executive Director of HSPESA, or designee, in conjunction with the Central Level Coordinated School Health Council, is authorized to implement, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the Wellness Policy in relation to the minimum requirements of a wellness policy, as required by law: goals for nutrition education, physical education, physical activity and other school-based activities that are designed to promote student wellness in a manner that the local educational agency determines as appropriate.


Evaluation Method: Goals will be established for nutrition education, physical education, physical activity and other school-based activities in Year One and monitored and evaluated in Years 2 and 3. Using evaluation methods derived from the Nutrition Education program (NEP), by the end of the 2008-2009 school year:

· Over 90% of students will be able to identify fruits and vegetables and over 80% will know how many servings of fruits and vegetables they should eat
· Over 90% of students will be able to identify which drinks have too much added sugar, which snacks are healthy, which beverage is the healthiest choice, and which foods keep their bones strong.
· Over 90% of students will be able to identify times when they used more energy and knew when they used less energy.
· Nutrition guidelines selected by the local educational agency for all foods available on each school campus under the local educational agency during the school day with the objectives of promoting student health and reducing childhood obesity
· Over 90% of students enrolled in physical education will have access to their individual fitnessgram results.
· Over 90% of the schools will have access to additional physical activity opportunities

Evaluation Method: Through on-site monitoring programs and nutrition analysis the District will be able to ensure meals are meeting guidelines. For example, in every Elementary, Middle and High School, snack sales of any non-approved snack products to students will cease as of June 30, 2008.

· Guidelines for reimbursable school meals, which are no less restrictive than regulations and guidance issued by the Secretary of Agriculture pursuant to Subsections (a) and (b) of Section 10 of the Child Nutrition Act (42 U.S.C. 1779) and Section 9(f)(1) and 17(a) of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1758(f)(1), 1766(a)0, as those regulations and guidance apply to schools;

Evaluation Method: Through on-site monitoring programs and nutrition analysis the District will be able to ensure meals are meeting guidelines. For example, such information will be made available on menus, a website, on cafeteria menu boards, placards, or other point-of-purchase materials.

· A plan for measuring implementation of the local Wellness Policy, including designation of one or more persons within the local educational agency or at each school, as appropriate, charged with operational responsibility for ensuring that each school fulfills the district's local Wellness Policy (A sustained effort by each district is necessary to assure that new policies are faithfully implemented).

Evaluation Method: The Executive Director of HSPESA, or a designee, in conjunction with the Central Level Coordinated School Health Council is authorized to implement, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the Wellness Policy.

Results
HSPESA and the Central Level Health Council will examine these questions when reviewing and Implementing the Goals for the Wellness Policy in Year One:

· What changes to nutrition education, physical education, physical activity, the nutrition quality of foods available to students, and other aspects covered by the policy occurred in each school as a result of the district Wellness Policy?
· Did the number of students participating in nutrition education change?
· Did the students have a different number of minutes of physical activity?
· Did any of the schools change available food options?
· Did participation in the National School Breakfast or Lunch Program change?
· Is the Wellness Policy making a difference?
· What's working?
· What's not working?
· How can the impact of the policy be increased to enhance its effect on student health and academic learning?

To evaluate the effectiveness of meeting the Measures That Matter:
100% of schools will score a grade B or better on the District's Safe Schools Audit.
Evaluation Method: The School Health Council at each school will measure safety using the CDC School Health Index measurement tool.

80% of all graduation seniors will enroll in post-secondary education institutions.
Evaluation Method: District data will be monitored to see whether the Wellness Policy has impacted post-secondary enrollment.

100% of schools will have equity in facilities, programs and resources.

Evaluation Method: The School Health Council at each school will measure equity using the CDC School Health Index measurement tool.

Goal: 100% of schools will have active Home and School Associations or School Councils.

Evaluation Method: HSPESA will be able to monitor the compliance of establishing School Health Councils in the district

95% of respondents on an annual survey will indicate they feel safe at school.

Evaluation Method: The School Health Council at each school will measure safety using the CDC School Health Index measurement tool.

Support services to all schools will be delivered on time, on budget, and with high quality.

Evaluation Method: HSPESA will be able to monitor the quality of support services provided in the district.

Disparity based on race, ethnicity, gender and socioeconomic status will be less than 10 percentage points on all measures.

Evaluation Method: District data will be monitored to see whether the Wellness Policy has reduced disparity to less than 10 percentage points on all measures.

100% of schools will have active partnerships with community organizations that foster the implementation of the District's mission.

Evaluation Method: The School Health Council at each school will measure community involvement using the CDC School Health Index measurement tool.

85% of all high school students will graduate.
Evaluation Method: District data will be monitored to see whether the Wellness Policy has affected the graduation rate.